A Weekend Trip to Hiroshima and Miyajima

My boyfriend and I have been living in Japan for almost two years, but our Japan travels have been pretty abysmal. So, very randomly, we decided to head out to Hiroshima for a weekend. OK, to be honest it wasn’t very random, it was because our booking was very last minute and all the nearby areas were super expensive, so Hiroshima was the only one that looked affordable.

(Although, later we discovered we completely forgot to factor in the cost of the Shinkansen, which completely bankrupted us. FYI, a one-way ticket from Tokyo Shinagawa station to Hiroshima station was 18,000JPY).

Anyway!

We started our trip in Miyajima. My colleague Charlotte told me that it was her absolute favourite place in Japan to visit, so I was pretty psyched to go check it out!

The first thing that we saw when we stepped onto Miyajima were the friendly deer!
The first thing that we saw when we stepped onto Miyajima were the friendly deer!
Honestly, if I had a kid I would be a bit frightened that the deer would gobble my baby up, but thankfully this kiddo remained intact.
Honestly, if I had a kid I would be a bit frightened that the deer would gobble my baby up, but thankfully this kiddo remained intact.
Now, it was lunchtime.
But the shopkeeper wasn't in the mood to feed dear ol' deery.
But the shopkeeper wasn’t in the mood to feed dear ol’ deery.
Deer went to look for other people then.
Miyajima is famous for Momiji, a star shaped snack that's a must have to have when you're there! There are lots of flavours, from red bean, to chocolate, to green tea, to whatever! Even deer flavor! No, okay, no, no deer flavor, I'm kidding.
Miyajima is famous for Momiji, a star shaped snack that’s a must have to have when you’re there! There are lots of flavours, from red bean, to chocolate, to green tea, to whatever! Even deer flavor! No, okay, no, no deer flavor, I’m kidding.
There were plenty of little shops to look at things.
Lots of things to make you hungry!
It was a really hot day, but the shopping area was covered so it was really pleasant to walk through.
They're famous for rice dippers! Smiley ones, because rice makes you happy!
They’re famous for rice dippers! Smiley ones, because rice makes you happy!
Fancy a fan?
Fancy a fan?
Sweets to tide you over.
Sweets to tide you over.
Brightly colored drinks. They look so cute here.
Brightly colored syrup for kakigori. The brighter, the healthier!!
More things to look at.
Some very stylish umbrellas to keep you dry.
Hankies?
This is me hanging out with a large rice dipper! Think of how much rice you could get from just one scoop…
Want a purse?
Steamed conger eel buns! I don't know what conger means, honestly. But I know what eel means, so that's enough I guess.
Steamed conger eel buns! I don’t know what conger means, honestly. But I know what eel means, so that’s enough I guess.
Some nice, fried, unhealthy snacks to fatten you up.
Some nice, fried, unhealthy snacks to fatten you up.
A closer view, just to make you hungrier.
A closer view, just to make you hungrier.
MORE rice dippers, because, well, one is simply not enough, is it?
MORE rice dippers, because, well, one is simply not enough, is it?
This is a happy Dutchie drinking Coke.
This is a happy Dutchie drinking Coke. He’s happy because it’s a HIROSHIMA Coke. And yes, it tasted a bit different from the regular Coke.
We went back to the beach to hang out with deer, but they weren’t too interested in me.
So then we switched focuses and went to snap some happy touristy pictures by the Itsukushima Shrine. HELLOO it’s in the water!
There was a horse held captive by the shrine.
It was pretty crowded that day.
Here, I was trying to read the prayers written but most of them were in Japanese so it was chotto muzukashi!
Then, we bumped into another deer who was thirsty but couldn’t work the vending machine.
We decided to head up to Daisho-in Temple. This isn’t the temple, though. This is just Alex stopping randomly and being happy.
When you go up the temple, you will pass what is called the 'Spinning Wheels of Sutra' - where Alex's hand is.Apparently, if you turn them, it has the same effect as reading them!
When you go up the temple, you will pass what is called the ‘Spinning Wheels of Sutra’ – where Alex’s hand is. Apparently, if you turn them, it has the same effect as reading them!
The route to the temple is very magical.
In fact even Anpanman makes an appearance.
In fact even Anpanman makes an appearance.
We came across these two charming girls, but I didn’t manage to ask them what they were doing.
Here’s a closer look. Does anyone know what ceremony this is?
We continued to explore.
So majestic.
Imagine living here a hundred years ago. How different things must have been!
Imagine living here a hundred years ago. How different things must have been!
This led to the Henjokutsu Cave, which was very dimly lit. When I stepped in there, I felt so different - there was a lot of spirituality in there.
This led to the Henjokutsu Cave, which was very dimly lit. When I stepped in there, I felt so different – there was a lot of spirituality in there.
The surroundings were still, and beautiful.
So peaceful.
After we left, we came across another deer. Here, I'm trying to have a face off but damn it the deer really doesn't care about me.
After we left, we came across another deer. Here, I’m trying to have a face off but damn it the deer really doesn’t care about me.
All in all, a very nice day in Miyajima!

The next day, we decided to explore Hiroshima a little bit. We went to the A-Bomb Site and museum. It was really terrible to see. The devastation of nuclear powers and of war is just so beyond comprehension.

This was my first glimpse of the A-Bomb site.
The day was really sunny, and the ruins of it was such a contrast to the beautiful day that it was.
Seeing this was just gripping. I’ve read about Hiroshima in my textbooks, but seeing something as real as this was just totally different.
From what I read, when the bomb went off, the river next to it was filled with bloated bodies.
We then walked around Peace Park.
From across the river, the A Bomb Site still clearly stood out.
We went into the museum after. If you’re interested, they have a time slot where they take you through the history in English. I didn’t go for this but just walked around the museum.
Lots of pictures of the devastation in the museum.
An actual tile from the blast.
A tricycle that belonged to a 3-year old. The 3-year old died in the blast, and his father buried his tricycle with him. Later, they dug it up and displayed it in the museum.

It was pretty heavy, and it’s hard not to walk away from it without feeling pretty emotional.

As we were only there for 2 days, we had to leave very quickly to head back to Tokyo, so my boyfriend and I decided to try out the famous Hiroshima okonomiyaki, at a restaurant called Nagata-ya. If in Hiroshima, go to Nagata-ya, it was very, very good!

For more of Foodventures, click here. I’m also currently working on a Tokyo Guide of the best restaurants to go to (with tons of restaurants that haven’t been featured on the blog!) If you’d like a free sample copy once it’s ready, just subscribe to us and you’ll get a sneak peek!

If you found this post helpful to you, do like Little Slices on Facebook for more updates!

Ann Jie

Loves good conversations and hates small talk. Finds people fascinating and wonders why meanies exist. Loves writing violent, graphic short stories but finds horror movies too scary to watch. Follow me on Instagram @annjieslices or tweet me a slice of YOUR life at @annjieslices!

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Subscribe now!

Get little slices directly to your inbox!